DR:WR

DR:WR is electronic.

 

Albums:

 


 


 


EPs:


 


 


 

REVIEWS:

A tone-desert as barren as Catterick Lorry Park

Oily loops of reverb’ed somethings snake in sinister circles; a gentle rumble is the slowest drummer – like yeast picked up the brushes.  ‘Dream Pollutants’ feels like some Replicant code-patch to increase anxiety and paranoia – take it slow Skin Jobs.

Lazily shifting shapes tip on hidden hinges to reflect a sooty light on ‘an attempt at exhuming nowhere’.  The see-saw effect makes this a meditative piece suitable for a trek in Nepal or charity shopping. Those times when you need to make peace with your creator (whoever she is) and open yourself to the bounty of the universe.  The final five minutes introduce giant’s steps plodding through the bog; slow and steady.

A thoughtless ohm thrown down a dark corridor? ‘Prebranded Features’ invokes Danielewski’s ‘House of Leaves ‘ with its eerie voicing’s that seem to endlessly descend into some unknowable horror.  Compact and neat this piece never stalls or chokes.  The layered lines lay as thick and deep as velvet; both opulent and oddly cloying.

But is it as bleak as the famed garrison town?  Give me answers dear reader.

Radio Free Midwich on Our Shadow Days (EPs 1-3)

This is one of them discs that doesn’t like to sit about too long.  It’s itchy, it’s twitchy and keen to get up, pogo, lie down, roll on the floor and pretty much do everything in its power to grab your attention.  This is just the sort of slap I need from time to time.  Sure…I’ve got the patience for a 50 minute plus drone workout but I often favour the sugar-rich rush of folk who just want to jam an idea, stop, re-set their equipment, than jam another as quick as silver.

DR:WR have an attention solution.  And so in that very spirit I’m going to write this as each track plays.  No filler or bumf.  No navel gazing or theorising.  Just first impressions hammered home on the keys as quick as these folk make ‘em.

Mung Crow: Guitar scree played in forbidden harmonics.  Lumping beatbox high with cowbell and handclaps.

Hyper Tile: Super-burnt-electrics ripple like hot water then turn to freezing Napalm.

Lumbargo Extraction: The sort of beat Basic Channel reject for being too out-there played in the dark…no lasers!

Blood Rental: Fizzing electric squid.

City Storms: Oi Eno?  Is this what you’re up to these days?  Ambient for the terminally uneasy.  Seagulls solo.  The cliffs crumble in slo-mo.

Sherbet Delay: Tubular Bells heard through the chill-out room door.  A 4am vibe when my nerves are shredded by 16 hours or drum & bass and … I drift … slowly … … off.

There you go.  An instant reaction to this frothy disc just champing to be played.  You’ve got some time don’t ya?  I urge you to click here for this and more speedy enlightenment.

Radio Free Midwich on Trippin’ Daggers Inner Skull Metal Blade Music

First then, a two track download from the school of The Zero Map. Firstly, ‘Wooden Flesh’ (reminds me of my entry to a ‘make up your own Channel 5 shock doc title’ contest: ‘The Boy With Wooden Legs… But Real Feet!’) sounds like dawn in one of those 2D, day-glo chthonic realms visited by the Yellow Submarine. Creatures gibber and shake the undergrowth as their cartoon anatomies burble. The middle section takes on a hunted tension then, having breakfasted on each other, the improbable animals settle down to the pan-dimensional business of the day.

‘This is not Thesis’ has a greater urgency to it. A crystalline shimmer is sullied, smeared as insistent ticking (at first) then a low end throbbing alarm (in the second movement) suggests there is only a very short amount of time left to defuse the suspect package – bristling with coloured wires – that no-one saw being delivered. If only you’d not spent your lunch break on the river bank eating magic mushrooms, eh? Luckily the only thing that happens when the big red LED counter gets down to ’00:00′ is that a little flag unfurls with the word ‘BANG!’ printed on it and we can all enjoy a pleasant come down.

Radio Free Midwich on Zamage: Music For Party

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